Seed Pods

Odd and even ash keys (seed-pods) were often used in divination.

Sandalwood

Sandalwood has many magickal uses, including protection, spirituality, exorcism, healing, and wish fulfillment. Scatter sandalwood powder around your home to clear it of negativity. Use in healing and exorcism spells. Write a wish on a sandalwood chip and burn in your cauldron. As it burns it sets your magick flowing. Sandalwood mixed with Lavendar makes a wonderful incense which is intended to conjure spirits.

Sage

This is useful for protection, healing, wealth, fulfilling wishes, and spells to increase longevity. One of my favorite uses for Sage is to powder some and add to my homemade yellow candles. These I burn on a Wednesday during the Waxing Moon to increase knowledge and wisdom.

Rosemary

This is a wonderful all-purpose herb that you can't afford to be without! Rosemary can be used as a substitute for just about any herb. Its powers include love, lust, protection, exorcism, purification, healing, longevity, youth, mental powers, and sleep...Rosemary is a wonderful incense...smoulder a bit of it to emit powerful cleansing and purifying vibrations and to rid negativity in the area in which it is burned (especially helpful to burn before performing any magick!) Place a bit of rosemary under your pillow to ensure a good night's sleep. Wear rosemary to aid your memory (especially helpful when you are studying for an exam). Add an infusion of rosemary to your bathwater to perserve youthfulness and to purify you. Carry a bit of rosemary with you to remain healthy. Hang a sprig of rosemary above your door posts.

Reed

Ng~NgEtal~Reed or Broom

The broom is a wide, bushy shrub that grows in abundance in the British Isles, and blooms in yellow pod-shaped  flowers. It can grow to seven feet in height, and its stem can grow very  thick and strong. Its branches are often dried and used as brooms (as the name suggests,) and a decoction of young branches and seeds can be used to treat malaria, gout and painful joints. It is also a good diuretic. Oil drawn from the stems (by heating them over and open fire,) can be used to treat
 toothaches, and for the removal  parasites such as lice.

Traditionally the Celts were a nomadic  people. They camped on one place  throughout the cold winter months, and  would break camp in the spring when the  first yellow blooms appeared on the broom. Although it has associations with spring, broom stands for the month  of October in the Ogham Calendar.

Mugwort

A Druid Sacred herb. Was placed in barns to protect cows from the influence of faeries. The herbs powers are strongest when picked on a Full Moon. Gather at the Summer solstice for good luck, and rub on ritual tools to increase power. Mugwort can be used as an incense (mixed in equal parts with Sandalwood)to aid in strengthening Psychic Powers. Try using it while scrying or before divination!!! Mugwort can also be placed next to the bed to aid in achieving astral projection. Its other magickal uses include strength, protection, prophetic dreams, and healing…

Ivy

G~Gort~Ivy
The ivy is not considered a tree, but depends on a host tree for support. Ivy belongs to the evergreen family, and oversees the month of September. It's leaves are deep green and rather waxy,  and it has thin tendrils that attach themselves to surfaces, and are strong enough to force their way into bricks, cracks, and plaster. Ivy can grow in such abundance on a host tree that it smothers the tree and actually kills it.

Ivy berries can be used for medicinal purposes, but can be poisonous if taken In large quantities. A broth of fresh leaves can be used to cleanse sores or wounds. A powder made from dried leaves and berries can be used to clear stuffy heads, and is also believed to be a cure for hangovers.

The Ivy was considered to be a very powerful tree to the Celts because of its ability to kill even the mightiest Oak tree. Because of its tendency to create dense, inpenetrable thickets in the forest, it is seen as more powerful than the vine, and rather sinister in nature.

Honey Fungus

Honey fungus or Armillaria is a genus of parasitic fungi that live on trees and woody shrubs. It includes about 10 species formerly lumped together as A. mellea.

Armillaria is long lived and form some of the largest living organisms in the world. The largest single organism (of the species Armillaria ostoyae) covers more than 3.4 square miles (8.9 km²) and is thousands of years old. Some species of Armillaria are bioluminescent and may be responsible for the phenomena known as foxfire and perhaps will o' the wisp.

As a forest pathogen, Armillaria can be very destructive. It is responsible for the "white rot" root disease (see below) of forests and is distinguished from Tricholoma (mycorrhizal) by this parasitic nature. Its high destructiveness comes from the fact that, unlike most parasites, it doesn't need to moderate its growth in order to avoid killing its host, since it will continue to thrive on the dead material.


Armillaria mellea
Bioluminescent Honey fungusAmong European rural people, especially in Gaelic, Slavic and Germanic folk cultures,[6] the Will-o'-the-wisps are held to be mischievous spirits of the dead or other supernatural beings attempting to lead travellers astray (compare Puck). Sometimes they are believed to be the spirits of unbaptized or stillborn children, flitting between heaven and hell. Other names are Jack O' Lantern, or Joan of the Wad, Jenny Burn-tail, Kitty wi' the Whisp, or Spunkie.[7]

Anybody seeing this phenomena might merely have been seeing, without knowing, a luminescing Barn Owl, at least in some instances. As strange as it may seem, much anecdotal evidence supports the fact that Barn Owls have a luminescence which may be due to fungal bioluminescence (Honey fungus) or some other cause.[8]