Folklore

The Old Corpse Road Folklore Collective

The Old Corpse Road Folklore Collective provides a resource for people interested in folklore, paganism, mythology, legend and all related matters. The site is aimed at those wanting to connect with other like-minded individuals and groups and allows us to share and enjoy the fruits of our past. We also extend our interests to all related matters such as black and folk metal, traditional folk music, artwork and local and worldwide events. If we sound like your type of people then join us. We accept all people into the collective as long as you respect one another...

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Vine

M~Muin~Vine The grape vine governs the month of August, the month in which the festival Lughnassadh is held. The fruit of the vine, the grape, can be used for many purposes: to make wine, calm coughs and distraught nerves, and aid in digestion. The leaves can be used (if boiled,) as a lotion for sore mouths, and as a poultice for inflammations. They are good for skin conditions, and a decoction of the leaves is often used as a treatment of kidney or bladder stones. The grape vine governs the month of August, the month in which the festival Lughnassadh is held. The fruit of the vine, the grape, can be used for many purposes: to make wine, calm coughs and distraught nerves, and aid in digestion. The leaves can be used (if boiled,) as a lotion for sore mouths, and as a poultice for inflammations. They are good for skin conditions, and a decoction of the leaves is often used as a treatment of kidney or bladder stones.

White Poplar

E~Eadha~White Poplar Of all the trees of the Celtic tree Ogham, the white poplar is most concerned with earthly and material aspects of life. Used by the ancients to make shields, it is believed to have the power to protect from death and injury. Poplars are often referred to as the 'whispering' or 'talking' trees, and in Irish Gaelic, as 'Crann Critheac', the quivering tree. The long flattened leaf stalks grow in such a way as to make a noise with every breeze that passes through the leaves.

Rosemary

This is a wonderful all-purpose herb that you can't afford to be without! Rosemary can be used as a substitute for just about any herb. Its powers include love, lust, protection, exorcism, purification, healing, longevity, youth, mental powers, and sleep...Rosemary is a wonderful incense...smoulder a bit of it to emit powerful cleansing and purifying vibrations and to rid negativity in the area in which it is burned (especially helpful to burn before performing any magick!) Place a bit of rosemary under your pillow to ensure a good night's sleep. Wear rosemary to aid your memory (especially helpful when you are studying for an exam). Add an infusion of rosemary to your bathwater to perserve youthfulness and to purify you. Carry a bit of rosemary with you to remain healthy. Hang a sprig of rosemary above your door posts.

Willow

S~Saille~Willow The willow in the Tree Alphabet, stands for the female and lunar rhythms of life. It is water-seeking, with a preference for damp, boggy areas, river banks, or low-lying meadows. It is an imposing tree, with a thick trunk covered by dark gray, heavily ridged bark. Its spreading branches create a very full shape, and its leaves are long and slender and covered with silver hairs that give the whole tree a shimmering appearance. The willow is sacred to the moon goddess, who rules the month of February, the willow month. The festival of Imbolc is held during the willow month, one of the two female fire festivals in the yearly cycle. The willow was also used as a protection against damp diseases. Its grooves wereconsidered so magickal that priests, priestesses and artisans sat among the trees to gain eloquence, inspiration, skills, and prophecies. The willow (helice) gave its name to the Helicon, abode of the nine muses, the orgiastic abode of the Moon Goddess.

Sage

This is useful for protection, healing, wealth, fulfilling wishes, and spells to increase longevity. One of my favorite uses for Sage is to powder some and add to my homemade yellow candles. These I burn on a Wednesday during the Waxing Moon to increase knowledge and wisdom.

Wormwood

An accumulative poison! A Druid sacred herb which was very magickal as well as sacred to Moon deities. Burn on Samhain to aid evocation, divination, scrying and prophecy. Combine with Mugwort for added effect.

Sandalwood

Sandalwood has many magickal uses, including protection, spirituality, exorcism, healing, and wish fulfillment. Scatter sandalwood powder around your home to clear it of negativity. Use in healing and exorcism spells. Write a wish on a sandalwood chip and burn in your cauldron. As it burns it sets your magick flowing. Sandalwood mixed with Lavendar makes a wonderful incense which is intended to conjure spirits.

Thyme

A Druid sacred herb. Repels negativity and depression. Wearing thyme will increase your ability to see the Sidhe. Sprinkle it at the base of your  door, and on window sills to invite the Faery to  enter your home.

Seed Pods

Odd and even ash keys (seed-pods) were often used in divination.

Reed

Ng~NgEtal~Reed or Broom

The broom is a wide, bushy shrub that grows in abundance in the British Isles, and blooms in yellow pod-shaped  flowers. It can grow to seven feet in height, and its stem can grow very  thick and strong. Its branches are often dried and used as brooms (as the name suggests,) and a decoction of young branches and seeds can be used to treat malaria, gout and painful joints. It is also a good diuretic. Oil drawn from the stems (by heating them over and open fire,) can be used to treat
 toothaches, and for the removal  parasites such as lice.

Traditionally the Celts were a nomadic  people. They camped on one place  throughout the cold winter months, and  would break camp in the spring when the  first yellow blooms appeared on the broom. Although it has associations with spring, broom stands for the month  of October in the Ogham Calendar.

Silver Fir

A~Ailim~Silver Fir

The silver fir, from the family  'Abies,' is a variety of pine that grows in the mountainous regions on the  upper slopes overlooking the lower  forests. Firs are known to grow to tremendous heights. Two silver firs planted by the Duke Of Argyll in the early seventeenth century stood untilrecent times, and reached heights of 124 and 130 feet.

The wood from fir trees is used in the making of furniture, and because of the straightness of the trunks, was used in the making of ship masts. It is a  source of turpentine, resin and tar, and a tea made from the shoots can be  used as a protection against urinary tract and kidney infections.

At one time, much of Scotland was covered with these great trees, but now  only small patches of them remain.